Blood Flow by David A. Hill Jr. – Review by Layna

35144051Title: Blood Flow: A Southern California Gothic

Author: David A. Hill Jr.

Synopsis:

Vampire democracy sucks. Literally. When it’s one vamp, one vote, the worst monsters can swing elections by turning random people off the streets into new vampires. Dylan is one of those random people. The power players in the city want his vote, but he just wants to be left the hell alone. Most of all, he wants to stop murdering people. That’s easier than it sounds when some people are seriously asking for it.

Dylan’s life as a vampire is gross, terrifying, disgusting, frustrating, sexy, painful, and that’s all just in the first night out.

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Review:

This is the story of Dylan, a freshly turned vampire. He finds out that he was just a pawn in vampire politics, that he was turned only to be just another vote. Dylan learns how to adjust to his new vampire life, learning new tricks along the way. He makes both friends and enemies along his journey. He’s tired of just being a pawn and stands up to the greater vampire forces that tried to control him.

Blood Flow had a refreshing take on vampires and vampire society. It was an interesting read and the story progressed at a nice and steady pace, sometimes moving along quickly. The ending I felt was a bit abrupt and rushed but kept me on the edge of my seat. All in all it was an attention grabbing story and was well written. This was the first book I have read by David A. Hill Jr. and I enjoyed the storyline. Blood Flow was a nice change of pace and story from other paranormal reads!

4outof5

~Layna

 

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4553895About the Author:

Bios are tough. I’m an author and game designer based out of the mountains of Japan. I’ve a soft spot for horror, urban fantasy, and science fiction. You might know me from my work on the game Vampire: The Masquerade. But now I’m out there doing my own thing, writing about vampires, about social issues, and the intersection of mythology and real life. I believe stories about monsters are actually stories about people, and that every good story about monsters is a story about the way people live and interact.

When I’m not writing about monsters, I build tiny plastic robot models, and explore Japan with my wife and three children.

Should I have written that in the third person? That’d be weird, wouldn’t it? “David Hill is an author and game designer based out of…” It’s really awkward, if you know I’m writing it about myself. But isn’t this commentary kind of meta anyway? Is this really the purview of author bio? Do I really need to be worrying about this when the world could fall apart at any minute? Should I really be writing books when I only have a limited time on this earth, and could theoretically be doing something more meaningful? Does anything have meaning?

Long story short, you should buy my books. Because what if they’re actually very important? What if they change the world, the way Bill & Ted changed the world with Wyld Stallyns? Wouldn’t you want to be part of that before it’s a thing?

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